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Dr.Michael E. Otim Assistant Professor Academic RankAssistant Professor

Specialization:

  • Health Economics and Public Health

Research Interests:

  • Health Economics; Economic evaluation, Priority setting, Financing of health care, Public health, Clinical trials, and Costing of interventions.

Contact

2011- Doctor of Philosophy [PhD] in Health Economics The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia 2005- Master of Economics with Honours [MEcon (Hons)], Centre for Health Economics and Program Evaluation, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia 1998- Postgrad Dip in Health Economics & Evaluation [PGDip Hlth Econ & Eval] Centre for Health Economics and Program Evaluation, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia 1997- Graduate Diploma in Economics Studies [GDip Econ] Department of Economics, University pf Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia 1993- Bachelor of Science – Honours [BSc (Econ) Hons] Department of Economics, Makerere University, Uganda
College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates 2016- to date: Assistant Professor, Department of Health Services Management Curriculum development and Teaching: Developing teaching curriculum Lecturing and tutoring Research and Service to the University Community: Supervising higher degree research students Serving in the university community committees Undertaking public health and health economic research School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University 2014 -2016 Senior Lecturer and Course Coordinator in Public Health Curriculum development and Teaching: Developing health economics curriculum Lecturing and tutoring health economics Thesis and Dissertation marking Review of journal articles Research and course coordination: Supervising higher degree research students Coordinating public health course Undertaking public health and health economic research Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney 2010 -2014 NHMRC Postdoctoral and Poche Research Fellow Research was focused on priority setting in Indigenous health and involved leading projects on economic costing and economic evaluation of chronic illness services in Aboriginal communities. National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, UNSW 2008-2009 Senior Research Officer Economic evaluation of the Singapore tobacco control program. Costing Intellectual Disability in Australia Melbourne University, School of Population and Global Health 2005-2007 Research Fellow, Centre for Health Policy Programs & Economics, Economic evaluation of interventions for non-communicable diseases for Indigenous populations. 1999-2005 Research Fellow at the Centre for Health and Society Health policy and funding of health services in Indigenous health. Accreditation of Victorian hospitals to treat Aboriginal people Victorian Department of Human Services, Bendigo, Australia 1999 Project Officer Role delineation of hospitals in Regional Victoria: Casemix Analysis of hospitals in the Loddon Mallee Region, VIC. Casemix Analysis of Victoria In-Patient Minimum Database (VIMD) data on role delineation of hospitals in the Loddon Mallee Region, DHS, VIC. Review of various models of service delivery for preschools in the Loddon Mallee Region, Department of Human Services, Bendigo. NSW Health, Australia 1998 Employer: Health Economist, NSW Health, Australia. Role: Budgeting and development of the pricing formula (1998) for an Artificial Limbs Service project. Central Sydney Area Health Services, Needs Assessment & Health Outcomes Unit (NAHOU) 1998 Health Economist, The University of Sydney, Australia Development of protocols for economic evaluation (cost-effectiveness analysis) of NAHOU research projects. Health Economics Associate, SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, Australia 1998 Economic Evaluation (Cost Effectiveness Analysis) of the pharmaceutical company products to determine pricing Preparation of company submission to Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Council (PBAC) for Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) listing. 1997 Research Assistant, Hunter Centre for Health Advancement, Newcastle University, Newcastle, NSW, Australia, 1996 Health Volunteers Overseas, Department of Orthopaedics, Makerere Medical School, Kampala, Uganda 1990-1992 Project Officer Library Resource person for the Master of Orthopaedics Course 1992-1994 Manager, Mulago Guest House Management and day-to-day running of the Guest House Sourcing business for the Guest House. 1993- 1995 Policy Analyst, Mulago Hospital, UGANDA.
1. Member of Australian Health Economics Society 2. Member of International Health Economics Association 3. 2014-todate: Member of Bachelor of Applied Public Health Course Implementation Committee, School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University. 4. 2014-2015: Member of Master of International Public Health Course Development Committee, School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University. 5. Member of Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
1. Co-Investigator, 2017: Pilot Study:Economic analysis of Happiness Prescribing, Dubai Health Affairs, Australia 2. Chief investigator for a Category 1 research grant. A randomised controlled trial to evaluate early intervention in Indigenous Australian children. I am leading the health economics component of the study. In collaboration with Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. Total funding is $1.4 million, 2015-2018 3. Advancing the knowledge, understanding and management non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis in children: A national multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) of children with Bronchiectasis -BEST study. I am a CI in collaboration with Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute (QCMRI), Australian Catholic University (ACU), University of Sydney (USyd), University of Auckland, Newcastle University and University Melbourne. NHMRC Grant, $1.185 M, (2013-2016) 4. Systemic gene expression and the economic cost of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in children: Enhancement of a NHMRC-funded randomised controlled trial, $158,246; CI Aus Financial Markets Children’s Foundation, 2013
1. Leonard Baatiema, Michael E. Otim, Shawn Somerset, Ama de-graft Aikins, Judith Coombes, George Mnatzaganian (2017) Health Professionals’ Views on the Barriers and Enablers to Evidence-Based Practice for Acute Stroke Care: A Systematic Review, Implementation Science (Accepted) DOI: 10.1186/s13012-017-0599-3. IMPS-D-16-00592R2 (IF: 3.201, Q1). 2. Leonard Baatiema, MSc; Michael Otim, PhD; George Mnatzaganian, PhD; Ama De-Graft Aikins, PhD; Judith Coombes, MSc; Shawn Somerset, PhD (2017), Towards best practice in acute stroke care in Ghana: a survey of hospital services. BMC Health Services Research 17:108, DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2061-2. http://rdcu.be/o0kf. (IF. 1.128, Q1) 3. Kerry-Ann F O'Grady, Keith Grimwood; Maree Toombs; Theo P Sloots; Michael E Otim; David Whiley; Jennie Anderson; Sheree Rablin; Paul J Torzillo; Helen Buntain; Anne Connor Musgrave; Don Adsett; Meng kar Oon; Anne B Chang (2017), "Effectiveness of a cough management algorithm at the transitional phase from acute to chronic cough in Australian children aged less than 15 years: protocol for a randomised controlled trial", BMJ Open 2017; 7: e013796. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013796 (IF 2.271, Q1). 4. Otim ME, Jayasinha R, Kelaher M, Houston S, Anderson IP & Jan, S, (2015), Priority setting in Indigenous health: Why we need an explicit decision making approach, International Indigenous Policy Journal, Vol. 6, issue 3. Retrieved from: http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/iipj/vol6/iss3/8. 5. Otim ME, Asante AD, Kelaher M, Doran CM, Anderson, IP, (2015), What constitutes benefits from health care services for Indigenous peoples, Australian Aboriginal Studies, Journal of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, 2015/1. ISSN: 0729 4352. (IF 0.276, Q3) 6. Debra Singh, Joel Negin, Michael Otim, Christopher G Orach and Robert Cumming (2015), The effect of payment and incentives on motivation and focus of Community Health Workers: Five case studies from low and middle- income countries, Human Resources for Health, 13:58. DOI: 10.1186/s12960-015-0051-1. URL: http://www.human-resources - health.com/content/13/1/58. (IF 2.416, Q1). 7. Hall K, Chang AB, Sloots T, Anderson J, Kemp A, Hammill J, Otim M & O’Grady, K (2015), The respiratory health of urban Indigenous children aged less than 5 years: study protocol for a prospective cohort study, BMC Paediatrics, 15:56. Doi: 10.1186/s12887-015-0375-y. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2431/15/56. (IF1.813, Q1). 8. Otim ME, Asante A, Kelaher M, Anderson IP, & Jan S (2015), "Acceptability of Program Budgeting and Marginal Analysis as a tool for routine priority-setting in Indigenous health", International Journal of Health Planning and Management. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hpm.2287 DOI: 10.1002/hpm.2287. (IF 0.554, Q2). 9. Otim ME; Jayasinha R; Forbes H & Shah S (2015), Building evidence for Peer-led interventions: Assessing the cost of the Adolescent Asthma Action program in Australia, Australian Journal of Primary Health (Online publication 19.9.2014). http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY14066. (IF 0.429, Q2). 10. Otim ME, Kelaher, M, Anderson, IP, Doran C, (2014), Priority setting in Indigenous health: assessing priority setting process and criteria that should guide the health system to improve Indigenous health, International Journal of Equity in Health, 13:45.. DOI: 10.1186/1475-9276- 13-45 http://www.equityhealthj.com/content/13/1/45. (1.316, Q1). 11. Asante AD, Martins N & Otim ME (2014), Retaining health workers in rural Timor-Leste: A critical appraisal of opportunities and challenges, Bulletin of the World Health Organisation, 92 (4): 229-308. DOI:10.2471/BLT.13.123141. (IF. 4.49, Q1). 12. Doran C, Einfeld SL, Madden RH, Otim ME, Hortstead SK, Ellis LA & Emerson, E (2012), How much does intellectual disability really cost? First estimates for Australia, Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability; 37(1): 1–29. (IF 1.347 Q1).
1. Using evidence-based models of care for acute stroke in Ghana: a cross-sectional and a qualitative study, (PhD) School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Australia. 2. Environment predictors of acute respiratory illness and its incidence in urban Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander children (PhD), Queensland University of Technology, Australia. 3. Advancing the understanding of exacerbations in paediatric bronchiectasis (PhD), Queensland University of Technology, Australia. 4. Economic and quality of life burden of acute and chronic cough in Australian children presenting to a paediatric emergency department, Masters, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
1. NHMRC Early Career Fellowship, Economics of Chronic Illnesses in Indigenous Australian Communities, Category 1 Fellowship $304,032, National Health & Medical Research Council, 2011-2017 2. Poche Fellowship 2013, Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, University of Sydney ($100,000) 3. Australasian Research Prize for the paper titled “How much does intellectual disability really cost? First estimates for Australia”, published during 2012 in the Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, (Vol. 37, No. 1). Judged to be the most innovative contribution by an Australasian author(s) resulting in positive life changes.
1. Louise Johnson (2016), Establishing factors that enable or inhibit student access to academic support services. Master of Education 2. Martin Bains, (2016), “Can inferencing be accelerated? A case study of the use of visualization to accelerate the emergence of inferential comprehension in Year 2 children”, MPhil thesis. 3. Adjunct Associate Professor, Queensland University of Technology, Australia 4. 2011-12: Editorial Board Member, International Journal of Healthcare ISSN 2377-7338 (Print) ISSN 2377 - 7346 (Online), Sciedu Press. 5. 2011-2017 Reviewer of articles submitted to the following journal for publications: a. Value in Health Regional Issues; b. International Journal of Health Care; and c. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy d. International journal of Health Management and Planning
• There is a common core of knowledge that needs to be transmitted to students in a systematic, disciplined way. • Intellectual and moral standards should be the focus of Education. • The core of the curriculum is essential knowledge and skills and academic rigor. • Schooling should be practical, preparing students to become valuable members of society. • Schools should not try to set or influence policies. Students should be taught hard work, respect for authority, and discipline.
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