Sign In
  • A-
  • A
  • A+
  • ع
  • A-
  • A
  • A+
  • ع
Dr.Khaled Mohammed Besbes Assistant Professor Academic RankAssistant Professor

Contact

• PhD in English Language and Literature (January 1999, the Faculty of Letters and Humanities of Mannuba, University of Tunis I, Tunisia, in coordination with the University of Westminster, Euston School of Languages, London, UK). • Master’s Degree in Comparative Linguistics and Translation (October 1991, The Faculty of Letters and Humanities of Mannuba, University of Tunis I, Tunisia). • Advanced Research Diploma (October 1993, the Faculty of Letters and Humanities of Mannuba, Tunisia). • English Language Teaching Diploma (June 1989, the Higher School of Teachers of Sousse). • Certificate of Success in ELT Methodology (August 1989, University of Manchester, UK).
• 2005 – 2015: Community College, University of Sharjah. Title - Assistant Professor. • 2003 – 2005: Career Development Program, University of Sharjah. Title - Assistant Professor. • 2001 – 2003: Islamic and Arabic Studies College, Dubai - Title: Assistant Professor. • 2000 – 2001: The Faculty of Letters and Humanities of Sousse, Tunisia - Title: Assistant Professor. • 1995 – 2000: The Faculty of Letters and Humanities of Sousse, Tunisia - Title: Lecturer. • 1992 – 1995: Bourguiba Institute of Modern Languages (IBLV) - Title: Lecturer.
(Teacher - Head of department - Assistant dean - Course coordinator) • 2014-2015: Head of the Basic Sciences Department at Community College, the UoS. • 2013-2014: Head of the Basic Sciences Department at Community College, the UoS. • 2011-2013: Assistant Dean and Chairman of the BSD. • 2005–2012: Head of the Basic Sciences Department at Community College, UOS. • 2007-2008: acting as an assistant dean at Community College, UOS. • 2003–2005: Coordinator of the English Department, Career Development Program, UOS. • 2001–2003: Coordinator of the Institutional Research Unit, Islamic and Arabic Studies College, Dubai.
• 2014-2015: Head of the Recruitment Committee Head of the Scientific Research Committee Head of the Conferences Committee Member of the Faculty Affairs Committee at the UoS. Member of the Advising and Guidance Committee at the UoS. • 2003-2013: member of the following committees: Recruitment Committee (Community College, UoS) Curriculum and Study Plans Committee (Community College, UoS) Community Service Committee College Website Committee Academic Accreditation Committee Schedules and Exams Committee • 2000–2001: Head of the Translation Committee of the English Department at the Faculty of Letters and Humanities of Sousse. • 1999–2001: Member of a national committee for the recruitment of secondary school teachers in Tunisia: CAPES. • 1996–2001: Coordinator of the 1st- and 2nd- year drama courses in the English department at The Faculty of Letters and Humanities of Sousse. • 1995–2001: Member of a national research unit, EDS, (English Departments Seminars). • 1995–1997: Member of the Advanced Writing Committee at Bourguiba Institute of Modern Languages (IBLV).
• “The Relevance of Relevance Theory to the Teaching of Literary Translation to Speakers of Arabic Language”, in the International Journal of Arabic and English Studies, vol. 14, 2013. • Rehabilitating Literary Theory, Universal Publishers, Florida, USA, 2011. (345 pages) • The Semiotics of Beckett’s Theatre, Universal Publishers, Boca Raton, USA, 2007 (325 pages) • Reinforcement (ESP textbook), IASC, 2005, Dubai. • Foundations: (ESP textbook), IASC, 2004, Dubai.
I was honored by Major-General Hamid Al-Hedidi at the Punishment and Correctional Institution of Sharjah
• I Translated into French a book entitled حديث الذاكرة الجزء الثاني by His Highness Sheikh Dr. Sultan Bin Mohammed Al-Quasimi • I edited a French translation of a book entitled الذاكرة الجزء الأول by His Highness Sheikh Dr. Sultan Bin Mohammed Al-Quasimi • I translated from French into English and Arabic a number of works for His Highness Sheikh Dr. Sultan Bin Mohammed Al-Quasimi • I volunteered to teach English courses at the Punishment and Correctional Institution of Sharjah on two occasions: in 2009 and in 2010
My philosophy of teaching has developed over many years of teaching experience. As I meditate on my practice with respect to teaching and learning, I become conscious that my undertaking as a teacher has always revolved around four main objectives: • endorsing positive learning; • developing critical thinking; • generating learning enthusiasm; • and promoting learner-centered strategies. To achieve this, I have always sought to employ a variety of strategies taking into consideration a number of rudimentary educational principles. These are: learning abilities, teaching approach, learning styles, lesson planning and assessment. Learning abilities Bearing in mind the perceptive abilities of learners is necessary in order to apply and put into practice strategies that are suitable for either concrete perception or abstract perception of learners. This is applicable to English language and literature, as well. To this end, I usually plan activities such as short writings, definitions of certain concepts or comprehension questions that can help me determine the learning levels of my students and conduct my instruction accordingly. - Teaching Approach I adopt a certain eclectic approach to teaching, combining both behaviorist (top-down model) and mentalist (bottom-up model) methods. Behaviorist theories offer a plethora of strategies that, when employed thoughtfully, can benefit classroom learning and management at all levels. Among these strategies, we mention: drilling, reinforcement, Together with this, mentalist principles provide important contributions to the field of language teaching, particularly in the active processing of language input. I usually design tasks that require critical thinking and that help learners to abstract language rules through practice, rather than giving rules and asking learners to apply them. I also believe in the effectiveness of pair work and team-based learning in language classes. - Learning styles Understanding the learning styles of learners and individual differences in the group usually helps me to design and adapt useful instruction by applying suitable teaching strategies. Lesson Planning: This is an important component of the teaching process as a whole. Whether the teaching approach is based on a behaviorist model (straight instruction, stimulus-response, reinforcement, drilling, etc.), a mentalist model (exposition, guidance, presentation, induction), or a constructivist model (inquiry-based/Socratic methods, group learning), I usually plan and conduct lessons that are in perfect tune with the set objectives. This helps me teach with both lucidity and motivation. Assessment: In view of the importance of assessment in measuring the efficiency of the teaching operation as a whole, I believe that one can make use of several alternatives to correctly assess the assimilation of the course among different types of learners. In addition to traditional assessment methods such as written exams, I employ a variety of tools, including: home assignments, quizzes, checklists, portfolios, presentations, etc. By adopting the above-listed tenets, I believe that the teaching operation can definitely yield positive outcomes, not only in terms of learning, but also in terms of motivation and dedication to knowledge.
Back to list