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Dr.Abdelhakim Khalifa meslem Assistant Professor Academic RankAssistant Professor

Contact

-Ph.D. (Statistics), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA, 1987 -Master (Statistics), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA, 1984 -D.E.S. (Mathematics), University of Sciences and technology of Algiers, Algeria, 1981
-1997-Now: University of Sharjah -1987-1996: University of Sciences and Technology of Algiers, Algeria -1990-1994: National Institute of Statistics and Planning-Algiers (Adjunct professor) -1984-1987: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Teaching & Research Assistant)
Teaching mathematics and statistics courses
Asymptotic Expansions for fixed width confidence interval. Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference 17 (1987) 51-65 North-Holland.
Statistics - for most people- is believed to be a number-crunching discipline. This belief took place from the fact that before computers, students used to spend a lot of time sorting out data in tables and graphs, and computing numerical summaries by hand or using calculators and spend little time learning the real task of statistics which consists of making sense of data and help people make educated decisions in the presence of variability. What the students really need to learn and be trained in is in understanding the concepts and the techniques and how to apply them in real life situations The computational or mechanical part is now taken care by high speed computers. So in teaching the subject of statistics specially to students with little mathematics background, my philosophy is to: • Insist on the concepts and their full understanding and not just how to compute new numbers out of others • Train students to use software - at least Excel- to summarize data in different tables and graphical displays and most important how to read the outputs and interpret them properly and thus understand the information correctly in order to turn it educated decisions. • Introduce every concept through a research question to answer with real data that is of interest to students to stimulate their participation and help them to better understand the statistical tools involved • Use simulation to teach concepts and results that would otherwise involve fancy mathematics well beyond the background of the students. • Use projects with real data of interest to students (or encourage students to collect their own data), analyze it using the techniques learned in class and sometimes go beyond if the techniques needed are not part of the program to answer a research question of their own to train them to apply the statistical process to real life situation that they may encounter. • Train them to communicate the results of the project in simple reports.
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