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Master of Science in Physics

College
College of Sciences
Department
Applied Physics and Astronomy
Level
Masters
Study System
Thesis and Courses
Total Credit Hours
34 Cr.Hrs
Duration
4 – 8 Semesters (Full-time) || 6 – 10 Semesters (Part-time)
Intake
Fall & Spring
Location
Sharjah Main Campus
Language
English
Study Mode
Full Time and Part Time

Master of Science in Physics

Introduction
The Master of Science in Physics (MScP) program spans a wide spectrum of physics topics that extend from nanostructures to astronomical dimensions. Integration of experimental and theoretical education and research is in the core of the program with the ultimate goal of yielding distinguished knowledge and cutting edge research skills.
The academic aims of the program are to prepare students for professional roles in the area of applied physics, with the knowledge and skills to advance the discipline from the academic, research and practical standpoints. The MScP program will prepare the students to address the current and future challenges in disciplines such as scientific industries, government laboratories, consultations, research and development, management and investment in Physics, and academic positions. The intent is also to prepare students to engage in independent and collaborative research in academic, governmental and applied science contexts. During this educative process, students will participate in knowledge generation and improvement, research synthesis, and knowledge/technology transfer.

 

Program Objectives
Program Goals
The goals of the program are to enable students to:
  1. Provide students with in-depth knowledge of advanced topics in their chosen sub-discipline of physics.
  2. Graduate students with the skills necessary to carry out independent research.
  3. Develop students' communication and teamwork skills.
  4. Produce graduates who are well prepared for the workplace or further studies (Ph.D.) in physics.


Program Learning Outcomes

Upon the successful completion of the program, students will be able to:

  1. Solve complex problems in physical applications.
  2. Use modern methods to carry out research and solve real life problems.
  3. Properly document and present the results of research work.
  4. Work effectively in teams and manage group tasks.
  5. Apply appropriate ethical standards to issues related to science, research, and work.
  6. Critically evaluate current information in the field of Physics.

 

Alignment of Program Learning Outcomes to NQF Emirates
NQF Emirates StrandProgram Learning outcome
Knowledge
-   Solve complex problems in physical applications

-   Use modern methods to carry out research and solve real life problems

-   Properly document and present the results of research work

-   Critically evaluate current information in the field of physics
Skills-   Use modern methods to carry out research and solve real life problems

-   Properly document and present the results of research work

-   Apply appropriate ethical standards to issues related to science, research, and work
Autonomy and responsibility-   Use modern methods to carry out research and solve real life problems

-   Work effectively in teams and manage group tasks

-   Apply appropriate ethical standards to issues related to science, research, and work
Role in context-   Solve complex problems in physical applications

-   Use modern methods to carry out research and solve real life problems

-   Work effectively in teams and manage group tasks

-   Apply appropriate ethical standards to issues related to science, research, and work
Self-development-   Use modern methods to carry out research and solve real life problems

-   Work effectively in teams and manage group tasks

-   Critically evaluate current information in the field of physics


Special Admission Requirements

To be admitted to the M.Sc. in Physics Program, candidates should fulfill the following requirements:

  • Must hold a bachelor’s degree or equivalent from a recognized university with a CGPA of 3.00 out of 4.00 or above.
  • Obtain 550 on the TOEFL exam or 6 on IELTS.
  • Applicants shall satisfy all the other admission requirements stipulated by the College of Graduate Studies and the Department concerned.



Program Structure & Requirements
ComponentsCredit Hours
Compulsory Courses
19
Elective Courses6
M.Sc. Thesis9
Total34
 

a. Compulsory Courses
No.Course Code Course Titleأسم المساقCredit
1.1430511 Methods of Mathematical Physicsطرق الفيزياء الرياضية  3
2.1430512 Electromagnetic Theoryالنظرية الكهرومغناطيسية3
3.1430513 Advanced Quantum Mechanicsميكانيكا الكم المتقدمة3
4.1430514 Statistical Mechanicsالفيزياء الاحصائية3
5.  1430521Condensed Matter Physics 1فيزياء المادة الكثيفة 13
6.  1430531Nuclear Physicsالفيزياء النووية3
7. 1430515 Research Methodologyمنهجية البحث العلمي1
 

b. Elective Courses
No.Course Code Course Titleأسم المساقCredit
1.1430622 Condensed Matter Physics 2فيزياء المادة الكثيفة 23
2.1430623 Many-body Physics          فيزياء الأنظمة متعددة الأجسام3
3.1430624 Computational Physicsالفيزياء الحاسوبية3
4.1430625 Physics of Semiconductorsفيزياء اشباه الموصلات3
5.1430626Quantum Optics and Photonicsالبصريات الكمية والضوئيات  3
6.1430627 X-ray Theory and Applications     نظرية الأشعة السينية و تطبيقاتها3
7.1430632 Particle Physicsفيزياء الجسيمات3
8.1430633 Quantum Field Theoryنظرية الحقل الكمي3
9.1430634 General Relativityالنسبية العامة3
10.1430628Special Topics in Condensed Matter Physicsمواضيع خاصة في فيزياء المادة الكثيفة3
11.1430635Special Topics in High Energy Physics مواضيع خاصة في فيزياء الطاقة العالية3
 

c.MSc Thesis
No.Course CodeCourse Titleأسم المساقCredit
1.1430599M.Sc. Thesis proposal                   مقترح أطروحة الماجستير    3
2.1430599M.Sc. Thesis                                          أطروحة الماجستير6




Course Description 

1430511 Methods of Mathematical Physics (3: 3, 0)
Ordinary differential equations and Sturm-Liouville theory, partial differential equations and Green’s functions, functions of complex variables, Group theory, Calculus of Variations, Hamiltonian’s principle, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics.

1430512 Electromagnetic Theory (3: 3, 0)
Electrostatics, magneto-statics, time-varying fields and Maxwell's equations, Gauge transformations, Poynting's theorem and conservation laws, plane and guided waves, retarded potentials, radiation from accelerated charged particles; scattering.

1430513 Advanced Quantum Mechanics (3: 3, 0)
Operators, state vectors, and the formal structure of quantum theory; operator treatments of simple systems; angular momentum and vector addition coefficients; stationary state perturbation theory; introduction to scattering theory for particles without spin, partial wave analysis, and Born approximation.

1430514 Statistical Mechanics (3: 3, 0)
The statistical basis for thermodynamics; Review of classical statistical mechanics; Postulates of quantum statistical mechanics; Micro canonical ensemble; Grand canonical ensemble; Ideal Bose gas; phonon gas and Ideal Fermi gas.

1430515 Research Methodology (1: 1, 0)
The main topics includes: What is research, research in physics, research methodologies and resources, writing research proposals, technical writing and publication, presentation skills, critical reviewing of research work.

1430521 Condensed Matter physics I (3: 3, 0)
The course covers the fundamental Physics concepts that help understand the electrical, optical and thermal properties of materials, Crystal lattices, Introduction to crystallography, Scattering of radiation, Lattice dynamics, Phonons and thermal Properties, Energy Bands in solids, Charge transport in  metals and semiconductors.

1430531 Nuclear Physics (3: 3, 0)
Hadrons, Nuclear forces, Nuclear masses and nuclear sizes, nuclear quantum numbers, binding energy, Bethe–Weizsäcker semi-empirical mass formula, valley stability, element of quantum mechanics, angular momentum, Rutherford Scattering, forces between nucleons, the liquid drop model, the Fermi gas model, Shell model, magic numbers, liquid drop model, collective model, alpha decay, beta decay, gamma decay, nuclear reactions, quarks and leptons as basic constituents, particles and brief introduction of the standard model.
 
1430622 Condensed Matter physics II (3: 3, 0)
Review of the Drude and the Sommerfeld models of metals and optical properties of solids. Plasmons, Polaritons, and Polarons. Superconductivity. Dielectrics and Ferroelectrics, Diamagnetism and Paramagnetism, Ferromagnetism and Antiferromagnetism, point defects, surface and interface physics, dislocations, Alloys

1430623 Many Body Physics (3: 3, 0)
Harmonic Oscillators and Phonons, Second Quantization for Particles, Electron-Phonon Interactions, Photons and Pair Distribution Function, Interaction Representation, S Matrix and Green’s functions, Wick's Theorem and Feynman Diagrams, Dyson 's Equation and Rules for Constructing Diagrams, Matsubara, Retarded and Advanced Green's Functions, Linked Cluster Expansions and Real-Time Green's Functions, Kubo Formula for Electrical Conductivity, Independent Boson Models, Bethe Lattice and Tomonaga Model, Exchange and Correlation, Wigner Lattice.

1430624 Computational Physics (3: 3, 0)
Survey of computer hardware and software: Linux and object oriented languages for scientific computing; Numerical methods for the solution of linear and nonlinear equations; Solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations with applications in physics systems, Oscillatory, Solar, random, statistical and mechanical; Monte Carlo methods with applications in statistical physics and phase transitions; Advanced computational techniques; First principles calculations.

1430625 Physics of Semiconductors (3: 3, 0)
Crystal Structure and Reciprocal Lattice, Electrons in a Periodic Potential, Models of Band Structure: Electrons and Holes, Density of States and Carrier Statistics, Carrier Transport, Phonons and Phonon Statistics, Scattering Processes, Excitons, Optical Absorption and Emission, Electroabsorption, Magnetoabsorption.

1430626 Quantum Optics and Photonics (3: 3, 0)
Radiative transitions in atoms. Quantum optics of photons. Photon statistics. Coherence and correlations. light-matter interactions in atomic and solid-state systems. Atom optics. Quantum computing and entangled states.

1430627 X-Ray Theory and applications (3: 3, 0)                  
Theory of X-ray production and interaction process. X-ray sources, X-ray tubes' design and operation, synchrotron radiation facilities, Cosmic rays. X-ray collimators and detectors. Analytical techniques: Radiography, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photo emission spectroscopy, total x-ray reflection spectroscopy. Applications to bulk material, surfaces, interfaces and nano-materials.

1430632 Particle Physics (3: 3, 0)
Introduction to gauge theories and QED, electroweak interaction, experimental Tests of EW-theory, strong interaction and QCD, experimental Tests of QCD, flavor structure of the SM. Standard Model and its components, Symmetries, invariances, and conservation laws. The Standard Model of Particle Physics, Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism, Higgs properties, high precision tests of the Standard Model at colliders, test of the Flavor Sector, searches for the new Physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM), Physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

1430633 Quantum Field Theory (3: 3, 0)
The formalism of quantum field theory, in particular: perturbation theory; Path integrals, Wick’s theorem; field quantisation; field-theoretical description of identical particles; Klein-­Gordon equation; Lagrange formalism for fields; symmetries, Feynman diagrams, action variations, Noether's theorem, symmetries and conservation laws. Fields with spin; internal and spacetime symmetries; spin-1/2 particles; Dirac equation; spin-1 particles; gauge invariance; Quantum Electrodynamics, non-Abelian Gauge Theories, Lie Algebras; SU(n) groups. Quantum Chromodynamics; ghosts; propagators, and vertex functions, Feynman rules and diagrams, renormalization; ultraviolet divergences in the effective potential and in scattering amplitudes; dimensional regularization; loop diagrams; renormalization scheme dependence in perturbation theory.

1430634 General Relativity (3: 3, 0)
Review of special relativity and Newtonian gravity; Gravity as geometry of curved spacetime; Geodesics and conservation laws; Schwarzschild geometry; Post-Newtonian expansions and tests of general relativity; Gravitational collapse and black holes; Linearized gravity and gravitational waves; Cosmological models for the expanding Universe.
 
1430628 Special Topics in Condensed Matter Physics (3: 3, 0)
The course would explore selected area(s) of Condensed Matter Physics hat address latest theories, discoveries and inventions. Selection of topics will be based on relevance and instructor’s preference.

1430635 Special Topics In High Energy Physics (3: 3, 0)
The course would explore selected area(s) of High Energy Physics hat address latest theories, discoveries and inventions. Selection of topics will be based on relevance and instructor’s preference.

1430599 Master Thesis Proposal (3: 0, 9)
The student has to undertake a thorough literature review and formulate a proposal for a suitable research topic under the supervision of a faculty member.

1430599 Master Thesis (6: 0, 18)
The student has to undertake and complete a research topic under the supervision of a faculty member. The thesis work should provide the student with in-depth perspective of a particular research problem in his chosen field of specialization.  It is anticipated that the student be able to carry out his research fairly independently under the direction of his/her supervisor.  The student is required to submit a final thesis documenting his research and defend his work in front of a committee.