Sign In
  • A-
  • A
  • A+
  • ع
  • A-
  • A
  • A+
  • ع
Dr. Hamzah Alzubaidi Academic RankAssistant professor

Specialization:

  • Clinical pharmacy and pharmacy practice.

Research Interests:

  • •Health service research •Diabetes management among ethnic minority groups •patient-centered care •Application of health promotion theories and models to strengthen patient adherence •Pharmacy practice; focusing on reduction of preventable medication related problems

Contact

1.PhD, Pharmacy Practice/Clinical Pharmacy, 2012, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, “Towards improving diabetes care among Arabic-speaking background immigrant population: examining cultural and health beliefs” 2.Master degree in Clinical Pharmacy, 2006, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Penang, Malaysia. Result: (top international student) AGPA 3.7 out of 4 3.Bachelor of Pharmacy (B.Pharm.Hon), 2004, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Ajman University of Science and Technology, Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Result: Excellent with honor with AGPA 4.1 out of 4.5
1.Assistant professor, College of pharmacy, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, period (15/11/2015 – present) 2.Senior Researcher, Royal Nursing District Services, Melbourne, Australia, Period (01/2015 – present) 3.Assistant professor/Lecturer, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Centre for Medicine Use and Safety (CMUS), Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, Period (06/2014 – 01/2015) 4.Lecturer, School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Period (02/2013 – 06/2014) 5.Lecturer, College of Pharmacy, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, Period (08/2006 – 07/2008)
Research group coordinator “Improving Health Care Delivery and Medicines Use” , period (24/06/2016-present)
1.Patient-centered care for people with chronic diseases: exploring barriers and enablers in the UAE. 2.Implementing diabetes and CVD risk assessment
1.Alzubaidy H, Mc Namara K, Marriott J, Stevenson V, Steele C, Chapman C. Medicine-taking experiences and associated factors: comparison between Arabic-speaking and Caucasian English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes (2015). The Diabetic Medicine. Volume 32, pages 1625–1633. The Official Journal of Diabetes UK (Impact factor; 3.1) 2.Alzubaidi H, Mc Narmara K, Kilmartin GM, Kilmartin JF, Marriott J. The relationships between illness and treatment perceptions with adherence to diabetes self-care: A comparison between Arabic-speaking migrants and Caucasian English-speaking patients. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2015;110(2):208-17.The official journal of the International Diabetes Federation (Impact factor; 2.6) 3.Alzubaidi H, Mc Namara K, Browning C, Marriott J. Barriers and enablers to healthcare access and use among Arabic-speaking and Caucasian English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative comparative study. BMJ Open. 2015;5(11).The BMJ open UK (Impact factor; 2.4) 4.Alzubaidy H, and Marriott J. Patient involvement in social pharmacy research: Methodological insights from a project with Arabic-speaking immigrants. The Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy. Volume 10, Issue6, November–December 2014, Pages 924–925, Published by Elsevier. USA. (Impact factor; 1.2)
Irrational use of antibiotics in the UAE: exploring physicians, pharmacists, and patients’ perspectives.
Research cooperative research award from Harvard School of Medicine.
Service as Reviewer in peer-reviewed international journals Journals 1.International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN NO.2210-7703, Publisher Spring Link, (Since: 02:2014) 2.Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, ISSN NO.1365-2753, Publisher Wiley online library, (Since: 06:2014) 3.Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN NO.1551-7411, Publisher Elsevier (Since: 09:2014)
The teaching philosophy that I believe in can be summarized by in four main themes: stimulating student interest, encouraging life-long learning, striving to achieve optimum outcomes for the patient, and creating a classroom environment that is conducive to learning and interaction. I believe that lectures who demonstrate curiosity and passion about a pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical care process motivate students to learn. I always try to co-teach with colleagues whose scholarship and expertise are complementary to mine as I believe that learning are enhanced by diversity and teamwork. My philosophy of teaching is informed and shaped by the material I teach and the lessons learned from personal teaching successes and failures. In the field of pharmacy practice, stimulating student interest can sometimes be challenging . Some topics contain a lot of dry material and other information that require memorization. I place great efforts on generating interest in learning and understanding rather than memorizing; focusing on demonstrating the rationale for taught courses, establishing the connections between seemingly unrelated facts or situations, and try to help students to recognize that all information will actually help them to provide better health care to a patient someday. I always try to break down complex practice-related and clinical issues into easier to understand concepts. I strongly believe that when students actually understand the concepts, they will be better able to apply those to real patient scenarios and will not have to rely on memorization. In addition, they can add new information to their foundation as new drugs are developed and technology changes by relating the new information to existing knowledge. Some of the techniques I employ for making difficult material easier to grasp would include role-playing. I often develop handouts in a table format to accompany the power point slides I use during lectures. I believe the table format allows students to compare/contrast similar disease states. Most of my teaching consists of active learning techniques (using audience response systems for example I use two programs: Poll everywhere and Socrative) and traditional lecture format, using power point slides which are made available to the students prior to the start of class. I assign readings prior to class, and often give quizzes at the start of class as incentive to actually read the assignment. I use the available technology, such as Blackboard as much as possible.
Back to list