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Advisory Board Committee
Dr. Mohamed Saleh Academic RankAssociate Professor

Specialization:

  • Pharmacology

Research Interests:

  • Immunopharmacology – Chronic kidney diseases – Diabetic complications – Hypertension - Diabetes

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.Sc. of Pharmacy (B.Pharm.), 2000 Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt M.Sc. in Pharmacology & Toxicology, 2004 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences (December, 10th 2010): Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, USA
1- Registered Pharmacist, 2000-2001 Work in retail pharmacy, Port Said, Egypt 2- Hospital Pharmacist, 2001-2002 El-Nasr Hospital, Port Said, Egypt 3- Demonstrator of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 2000-2004 Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt 4- Instructor of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 2004-2006 Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt 5- Ph.D. Graduate Student, 2006-2010 Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, USA 6- Post-Doctoral Fellow, 2010-2011 Mentor: David M. Pollock, Ph.D. Vascular Biology Centre, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, USA 7- Assistant Professor, 2011-2016 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt 8- Post-Doctoral Fellow, 2012-2016 Mentors: Meenakshi S. Madhur, M.D., Ph.D. and David G. Harrison, M.D. Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA 9- Associate Professor, 26th September 2016 – Current. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt. 10- Associate Professor, 22nd August 2018 – 20th August 2019. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Imam Abulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 11- Associate Professor, 21st August 2019 – Current. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.
Biomedical Research Molecular Biology Research Academic teaching (undergraduate and postgraduate for all related health sciences fields)
American Physiological Society (APS), 2007-present. American Heart Association (AHA), 2007-present. American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2007-2009. American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET), 2008-2010
1- American Heart Association - Great Southeast Affiliate Pre-Doctoral Fellowship (2009-2011). $21,770 per year. 09PRE2050253 (Mohamed A. Saleh) 07/01/2009 – 6/30/2011 AHA South East Affiliate Pre-Doctoral Fellowship Role of ET-1 in Glomerular Inflammation and Glomerular Permeability in Normal and Diabetic Kidneys Role: Principal Investigator. 2- American Heart Association – Great Southeast Affiliate Post-Doctoral Fellowship (2014-2016). $44,550 per year 14POST20420025 (Mohamed A. Saleh) 07/01/2014 – 06/30/2016 AHA South East Affiliate Post-Doctoral Fellowship Differential Roles for Interleukin 17A and F in Hypertension Role: Principal Investigator.
1- Mohamed A. Saleh, Erika I. Boesen, Jennifer S. Pollock, Virginia J. Savin, and David M. Pollock. Endothelin-1 Increases Glomerular Permeability and Inflammation Independent of Blood Pressure in the Rat. Hypertension 2010 Nov;56(5):942-949. 2- Mohamed A. Saleh, Erika I. Boesen, Jennifer S. Pollock, Virginia J. Savin, and David M. Pollock. ETA Receptor Specific Stimulation of Glomerular Inflammation and Injury in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats. Diabetologia 2011 Apr;54(4):979-988. 3- Mohamed A. Saleh, Jennifer S. Pollock, and David M. Pollock. Distinct Actions of Endothelin A-Selective Versus Combined Endothelin A/B Receptor Antagonists in Early Diabetic Kidney Disease. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 2011 Jul;338(1):263-270. 4- Mohamed A. Saleh, William G. McMaster, Samuel A. Funt, Salim R. Thabet, Jing Wu, Liang Xiao, Allison E. Norlander, Danielle Michell, Annet Kirabo, Wei Chen, Hana A. Itani, Tianxiao Huan, Daniel Levy, David G. Harrison, Meena S. Madhur. Lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK deficiency exacerbates hypertension and end-organ inflammation. The Journal of Clinical Investigation 2015 Mar 2;125(3):1189-1202. 5- Mohamed A. Saleh, Allison E. Norlander and Meena S. Madhur. Inhibition of Interleukin-17A, But Not Interleukin-17F, Signaling Lowers Blood Pressure, and Reduces End-Organ Inflammation in Angiotensin II–Induced Hypertension. Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC): Basic to Translational Science. 2016 Dec;1(7):606-616.
1- Co-mentor on the PhD Dissertation for Dr. Manar Ahmed Gamal. Title: The Effect of Green Tea Extract on Liver Fibrosis (Experimental Study) The Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, EGYPT (2012-2015).
1- 28th Southeastern Pharmacology Society, Poster-Presentation Winner-3rd place (2007). 2- APS Travel Award- Experimental Biology Meeting (2008). 3- The Department of Pharmacology Annual Graduate Student Research Award -2nd place (2008). 4- Caroline Tum Suden/Frances A. Hellebrandt Professional Opportunity Award- Experimental Biology Meeting (2009). 5- ASPET Travel Award - Experimental Biology Meeting (2009). 6- The Department of Pharmacology Annual Graduate Student Research Award-3rd place (2009). 7- Water and Electrolyte Homeostasis (WEH) Travel Award - Experimental Biology Meeting (2010). 8- Water and Electrolyte Homeostasis (WEH) Oral Presentation Award - Experimental Biology Meeting (2010). 9- Finalist for the 2010 Renal Section Pre-Doctoral Excellence in Renal Research Award - Experimental Biology Meeting (2010). 10- Award of Excellence in Research – Graduate Research Day, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (2010). 11- O’Brien Fellowship in Indiana Center for Biological Microscopy, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, IN (2010). 12- Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges for 2011. 13- Finalist for the 2011 Renal Section Pre-Doctoral Excellence in Renal Research Award - Experimental Biology Meeting (2011). 14- Ranked First abstract submitted to Vanderbilt University Medical Center Post-Doctoral Association and Shared Resources Symposium (2014). First Place Award and Orally Presented. 15- Mansoura University Award for Scientific Publications (2012, 2013, 2014, 2015). 16- Mansoura University Award for High Impact Factor Research (2015). 17- Mansoura University Award for Scientific Innovation (2016).
Since I was young, I have always found science to be invigorating and this was in part due to the efforts of different teachers that I’ve had. In recent years, as I’ve grown as a scholar in my fields of pharmacy, pharmacology and physiology, my desire to teach and share this knowledge has grown. As a teacher, I aim to induce the same feelings of passion and excitement in my students that I once felt as I began my studies. Students of the sciences learn best when the central topics are presented in lecture format, however, it is also essential to break up the lecture to allow for group discussions and participation as these interactions foster deeper understanding of the material. At the beginning of each course, I will present the classroom space as an area safe and ideal for interaction, discussion and learning. The responsibilities of the student will be outlined clearly. It is imperative to challenge the students to learn; they should expect to participate routinely in class as this helps to keep their attention and also allows them to determine where their weaknesses lie in reference to the presented material. In order to assess the student’s level of learning, quizzes and exams will take place routinely throughout the semester. Further, I will allow time for students to write down and hand in questions at the end of each lecture, as another way to determine the amount of student understanding. The questions from the end of class that have arisen most frequently among students will then be discussed at the beginning of the subsequent lecture to clarify common points of confusion. I also aim to use different technologies in my classroom, such as interactive CD animation, videos and powerpoint to facilitate student learning through different media. It is also important to, as an instructor, challenge myself. My responsibilities to the students will also be clearly outlined at the beginning of the semester. My students should expect me to present up to date material both clearly and in a way that is engaging. My teaching will be evaluated through student and peer evaluations. Depending on the size of the classroom, I will attempt to make personal connections with the students, feelings of inclusion within the classroom are important to student learning. This will be accomplished through several one-on-one meetings throughout the semester which are used to gauge their progress. It is also important to allow them to connect with each other; this can occur through the use of discussion sections during class and alternatively through the use of small group projects. These scenarios help to render the classroom a safe space and to promote the development of questions and therefore learning. In addition, numerous studies including those by Light et al. and Johnson et al. describe the benefits of collaborative learning, or using peer interaction to stimulate active learning, in college learning. Johnson et al. say that it involves ‘promotive interaction’ where students encourage the achievement of others while working on their own to complete group goals. I plan to incorporate collaborative group projects in my teaching to help students master life skills such as critical thinking and problem solving. I plan to employ backward design on suitable topics in my classroom. Students of biology, or the sciences in general, learn best when they are presented with a problem at the, say a disease for example, and the goal of the lecture then becomes to ‘solve’ or ‘understand’ said problem by learning the molecular mechanisms that result in health and what errors can occur in the pathway resulting in disease. The students therefore will learn the biological mechanisms the class is designed to present, but in such a manner that promotes the development of critical thinking and problem solving, skills essential to careers in the sciences. As I have stated, I believe participation and active learning are vital to lecturing. Further, recently published research by Carvalho et al. and Dietz et al. in Advances in Physiological Education have discussed benefits and approaches to using active learning in physiology classrooms. My experiences guest lecturing in a human physiology class displayed the ability of eliciting engagement through use of lecture related questions to stimulate learning and facilitate deeper understanding of the material. Therefore, I plan to regularly employ different types of ‘change-ups’ in my classroom, since flexibility in participatory activities is key as routine could potentially lead to less activity and boredom. I plan to use activities such as polling the students, punctuating the lecture with questions, breaking the students up for small group discussions and using think-pair-share, etc. For example, the students will answer questions in small groups that appear in the powerpoint during the lecture that address key take-home topics presented in an assigned reading or paper. It is my hope that students will use what they have learned in my classroom in other areas of life. I aspire to teach in a way that stirs creativity and critical thinking in my students that will help them to become, if they so choose, successful scientists. My teachers and mentors have inspired me to become an enthusiastic lifelong learner; I hope to pass on this desire to my students.
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