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Dr.Jalal Taneera Department of Basic Medical Sciencee Academic RankAssistant Academic

Specialization:

  • Experimental Endocrinology

Research Interests:

  • Diabetes Research

Contact

• 2002-2007- Ph.D. degree in experimental endocrinology, Clinical Research Center, Lund university, Lund, Sweden. • The title of my thesis “Stem cell Plasticity, hype or Hope?” • 1999-2001- M.Sc. degree in biomedical laboratories, Department of infectious diseases and Medical Microbiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. • The title of my thesis “ Helicobacter infection” • • 1992-1997- B.Sc. degree, Medical Laboratory Technology, Al-Isra University, Amman, Jordan
• 2011 – Research scientist at Lund University Diabetes Center (LUDC), Department of diabetes and Endocrinology. • 2007-Dec/2010: Coordinator of The Human Pancreatic Islets facility at Lund University (LUDC). • 2002-2007- PhD study at Clinical Research Center, Lund University. • 2014-2016: Medical Advisor, Comoray, Lund, Sweden
Member of the editorial board of • Journal of Endocrinology and Diabetes Research • Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism.
Identification of Novel genes contributing to type 2 diabtes. 2- Exploration of functional mechanisms of genes involve in type 2 diabetes. 3-FTO silencing in INS/1 cells. 4- Genetic profile for cells expose to high glucose conentartion
• Identification of novel genes for glucose metabolism based upon expression pattern in human islets and effect on insulin secretion and glycemia. Taneera J, Fadista J, Ahlqvist E, Atac D, Ottosson-Laakso E, Wollheim CB, Groop L. Hum Mol Genet. 2015 Apr 1;24(7):1945-55. • Downregulation of type II diabetes mellitus and maturity onset diabetes of young pathways in human pancreatic islets from hyperglycemic donors. Taneera J, Storm P, Groop L. J Diabetes Res. 2014;2014:237535. • Autoimmunity against INS-IGF2 protein expressed in human pancreatic islets. Kanatsuna N, Taneera J, Vaziri-Sani F, Wierup N, Larsson HE, Delli A, Skärstrand H, Balhuizen A, Bennet H, Steiner DF, Törn C, Fex M, Lernmark Å. J Biol Chem. 2013 Oct 4;288(40):29013-23. • Expression profiling of cell cycle genes in human pancreatic islets with and without type 2 diabetes. Taneera J, Fadista J, Ahlqvist E, Zhang M, Wierup N, Renström E, Groop L. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2013 Aug 15;375(1-2):35-42. • A systems genetics approach identifies genes and pathways for type 2 diabetes in human islets. Taneera J, Lang S, Sharma A, Fadista J, Zhou Y, Ahlqvist E, Jonsson A, Lyssenko V, Vikman P, Hansson O, Parikh H, Korsgren O, Soni A, Krus U, Zhang E, Jing XJ, Esguerra JL, Wollheim CB, Salehi A, Rosengren A, Renström E, Groop L. Cell Metab. 2012 Jul 3;16(1):122-34.
Expected to have my first postgraduate student this semester.
• New investigator award, 34th annual scientific meeting of the international society of experimental Hematology, Glasgow, UK. 2005. • Best Young Investigator on diabetes research in Scandinavian countries, 2013, Helsinki, Finland
1- member of the animal care facility at University of Sharjah 2- member of the Research committee at the college of medicine.
Teaching philosophy: I have the experience and talent to teach cell and molecular biology course. As a teacher I strive to engage, challenge, and inspire growth in my students. It is my belief that every student is capable of tasting the passion that I feel for cell biology. My first goal is to create an atmosphere that encourages participation and involvement. My teaching history is not only a practical experience, but it is a passion that I have lived, grown and adhered to. I always have the commitment not only to deliver the correct knowledge but also to use to best method to teaching students. I prefer to teach through demonstrations: by conducting experiments and analyzing data in the classroom, by participating in small group debates and role-plays, by observing and chronicling behaviors from “the real world,” and by discussing design case studies. I encourage my students to ask questions, and I am straightforward about not having all of the answers. When I become “stuck” I seek the input of my colleagues, my books, and the endless array of resources that can be found on the Internet. When I next return to the classroom, I share not only the answer that I’ve found, but also the process I went through to discover it. Above all else, I challenge my students to understand that I am open to their thoughts, eager to hear their opinions, and thrilled to learn with and through them. I believe in the essence of students involvement working in groups or on projects in most of my courses. I take seriously my responsibility to guide discussion and to explicate new or difficult material, but I do so in a manner that encourages rather than suffocates thoughtful dissent and lively questioning. Face-to face instruction has continually challenged me to make lessons fresh and effective. Teaching cell and molecular biology to students is exciting in its demands and personally rewarding. It has also improved my research and writing, as I review and present topics in different ways, with broad perspectives, and to new audiences.
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