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Prof.Abdul-Fattah Abu-Ssaydeh Professor, Department of Foreign Language Academic RankProfessor

Specialization:

  • Ph.D. in Linguistics, Leeds University, UK, 1980

Research Interests:

  • Metaphors Collocation Idioms Bilingual Lexicography Lexical Corpora Culture-Specific Words

Contact

Ph.D. in Linguistics, University of Leeds, UK, 1980.
Lecturer, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 1980-1982 Assistant Professor, Bahrain University, Bahrain, 1982-1992 Associate Professor, Bahrain University, 1992-1994 Associate Professor, Petra University, Jordan, 1994-1995 Sydney University, 1995,-1998 Associate Professor, Ajman University, 1998-2000 Associate Professor, Sharjah University, 2000-2006 Professor, Sharjah University, 2006-Now
Since graduation in 1980,I have been involved in teaching at the tertiary level in several Arab universities. I have also pursued research in several areas related to contrastive linguistics and translation. I have published around twenty-eight papers and four dictionaries. Additionally, I m currently working on a 7,000-page database of Arabic and English collocations which I hope to finalize in the next two years or so. My professional life has also included attending and participating in numerous regional and international conferences in several countries including UAE, Jordan, Denmark, Oman, Poland, the UK, China and Belgium.
Member of APETAU.
The compilation of an Arabic-English Database
Papers: A bibliography of specialized dictionaries in the Arab World, Al-Lisan Al-Arabi, No. 27, 1987 The Computer and Translation, Al-Lisan Al-Arabi, No. 28, 1987 Towards a collocational dictionary, Al-Lisan Al-Arabi, No. 32, 1989 Specialized dictionaries in the Arab World, Al-Lisan Al-Arabi, No. 33, 1989 The western press and the language of Arabic political news, FIT Newsletter, 1991 A Dictionary for Professional Translators, Babel, 32, 1991 An Arabic-English dictionary of Arabic Idioms, Al-Lisan Al-Arabi, No, 36, 1992 Business Translation: A Personal Perspective, Babel, 39-1, 1993 An Arabic-English Collocational dictionary: issues in theory and methodology, Babel, Volume 41, No. 1 (1995) Trends in Arabic Lexicography, Al-Lisan Al-Arabi, No, 38, 1995 Synonymy, Collocation and the Translator, Turjuman, Vol 10, Number 2, October 2001 Similes and Metaphors in Arabic and English. Turjuman, King Fahd School of Translation. Volume 12, No. 1, April 2003. Similes: the Dictionary and Beyond. Interface: Journal of Applied Linguistics. 17.2. (2003). Belgium Translation of English Idioms into Arabic: A Case Study. Babel, Volume 50:2 (2004), Pp. 114-131 Atlas: Problems of Equivalence. Published Turjuman, Vol 32:2, pp. 101-139 (2004) Variation in Multi-word Units: The Absent Dimension. Studia Anglica Posnaniensia, Poland, Vol 41, (2005), pp. 125-147 Multi-word Units in English-Arabic Dictionaries: Status and Equivalence Strategies. Turjuman. Vol. 14, no. 3, (2005), pp. 55-88 Missing in Compilation: How Much English is There in an Arabic-English Dictionary? IJAES, Vol 6 (2005) Multi-word Units: Can Lexicography Help in Their Acquisition? Babel Volume 50, No 4, (2006) Equivalents of جدّاً and تماماً : Intensification in English, Turjuman, (2006) Collocation in Arabic-English Dictionaries:, Journal of Arabic Linguistics, Germany, Volume 48, (2008) The Day the Tsunami Hit the Arabic Communication Media Shores. Sent to Turjuman Computer-based tools: their role in translator training. Accepted for publication in META, Canada, accepted for publication. Lexicalised Metaphors in the Bilingual Dictionary. Turjuman, 2012. Culture-specific words in the bilingual Dictionary. Is a pedagogical dictionary a viable proposition? Accepted for publication in AJAES Published Books: A.F. Abu-Ssaydeh. Al-Murshid: A general Arabic-English Dictionary. 2013, Dar Al-Sharq Wa L-Gharb for Publishing and Distribution, Amman, Jordan. A.F. Abu-Ssaydeh. A.F. Abu-Ssaydeh. 2005. A Dictionary of Similes and Metaphors. Beirut: Dar El-Khayyal. A.F. Abu-Ssaydeh. 2005. An English-Arabic Dictionary of English Idiomatic Expressions. Beirut: Dar El-Khayyal and Addar Al-Wataniyya Al-Jadeeda Linnashr Wa-ttawzee’ A.F. Abu-Ssaydeh. 2005. An Arabic-English Dictionary of English Idiomatic Expressions. Beirut: Dar El-Khayyal (2005).
I have supervised and acted as internal examiner for several of the M.A. in Translation Program students. Awards and Recognitions: Several Scientific and Administrative Excellence Awards from Sharjah University over the years.
My teaching philosophy is founded in the belief that learning is a life-long process and that learning rather than teaching is the cornerstone of the whole process. To me it is crucial to enable students rather than teach them, to provide an environment for them to learn rather than instruct them, to make them solve problems by themselves and acquire skills rather than provide them with solutions. Moreover, in dealing with my M.A. students, I do my best to ensure that the knowledge I impart is as up-to-date as possible; this is attained through continuously reading the latest research in the field and delving deeper into any areas that are of interest to me or to my students. For example, one of my students is interested in doing some research on translation and ideology. I did a lot of research on this topic and focused more closely on the sub-topic of censorship as an area where ideology and translation converge. Thirdly, I like to research issues that have immediate bearing on the process of translation and learning English as a foreign language, which is of immediate relevance to translation. This interest has helped me to conduct and publish papers and books in the field of metaphor, multiword units, especially idioms, collocation and bilingual lexicography. The realization that none of the current Arabic-English dictionaries fulfils the actual needs of the translator has encouraged me to compile and publish one of the most comprehensive general dictionaries in the field. The results of my research are also used in my courses in the M.A. Program; topics such as metaphors (both lexical and conceptual), idioms, collocation and bilingual lexicography are continuously raised, issues are explored and answers are sought. The discussion is enriched as usual by the experience some of the students bring to the course in their capacity as practicing translators. Finally, I would like to illustrate some aspects of my teaching philosophy through demonstrating how I teach one particular course at the M.A. level, namely Legal Translation. This course prepares students not only to become legal translators but also to be familiar with and gain practical experience in the translation of different types of legal texts, identify stylistic features and acquire several hundred legal terms while translating texts. In this course, I try to emphasize the need for continuous reading of legal texts in a parallel corpus; through this reading, students will pick up terminology, stylistic features and any other peculiarities the text in question may demonstrate. For example, becoming familiar with five to ten resolutions issued by the UN Security Council will take the students a long way towards producing a fairly good translation of such resolutions. The same principle applies to powers of attorney, employment contracts, lease agreements, etc. Additionally, I try to emphasize the importance of term mining and the analysis of the syntactic features of the text in question through reviewing other texts on the same sub-genre. I ask students to pick up the stylistic features themselves and see how they are rendered in the target language. Finally, I seek to encourage students to develop their own database of legal documents for future reference and to judge the validity of the decisions they take in the process of translation by discussing these decisions in the group.
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